More about Shatar, the Mongolian Chess

Les échecs mongols, compléments

Quoi de neuf ?

Mes livres

Histoire des échecs

Variantes

Liens

This page contains more illustrations about Shatar, the Mongolian Chess. All of them have been provided to me by Rodolfo Pozzi (or borrowed from his on-line articles) who is deeply acknowledged. Rodolfo Pozzi is Italian and is a Chess set collector. He is the author of several booklets and papers about Chess history and he is a recognized expert of Mongolian Chess.

click to enlarge
Game of Shatar inside the yurte

The Nojon (Noyion): equivalent to the King.

Click to enlarge
Nojon riding quiver and two hounds. Painted wood,
Mongolia, 19th century.

Click to enlarge
Two wooden Nojons (Inner Mongolia, Assia Popova)


Nojons riding horses 

Click to enlarge
Two bronze Nojons

Click to enlarge
Metallic Nojons. One is aggressive (a warrior from Genghis Khan period), the other is peaceful (a nomad Khan seated).

Click to enlarge
Two bronze Nojons (beg. 19th c.)


Bronze Nojon with the soyombo symbol on the back of the throne

Click to enlarge
King represented by a woman on camelback 

Click to enlarge
Mongolian bronze Nojon, Chinese influence

Click to enlarge

Two musicians Nojons, wood, 1960


Mongolian Kings holding sacred book (wood, 1920-1930)

 

The Bers: equivalent to the Queen.


Nojons and Bers (wood, 1950)

Click to enlarge
Stone Bers


A Bers and two Xüü compared to the symbolic lions on the Tibetan flag


Mongolian Bers and Xüü as tigers (wood, 1920-30)


Black Tereg (Rook) and white Bers, both in form of bulls (Mongolia).

 

The Temee: equivalent to the Bishop.

Click to enlarge
Temee from a bronze set (1870)

Click to enlarge
Temee from a wooden set (1930)

Click to enlargeClick to enlarge

Click to enlarge

 Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge
(wood, 1850)

Click to enlarge
A drinking Camel (Temee) along with two Horses (Mor')


Wooden Temee (c. 1850)

Click to enlarge
Bronze

Click to enlarge
Wooden Temee (ca. 1850)

Click to enlarge
Ivory (20th c.)

Click to enlarge
Wooden Temee (ca. 1850)


 Wooden Temee in a not natural motion (1960)

Click to enlarge
(wood, 1922-24)

Click to enlarge
Two Temee, standing and lying (wood, 1940)


Bronze Temee and Mor', females with their heird (1870).


The Xüü (Pawn) is a boy collecting the Camel's shit which will be used for the fire.

Click to enlarge
Fighting camels (wood, 19th c.)

 

The Mor' (Mori): equivalent to the Knight.

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge
Four Tuvinian Mor'


Wooden Horses. (The one in the middle is from 1820)

 

The Tereg (Terghe): equivalent to the Rook.

Click to enlarge

Losanges and peacock tails (Musée de l'Homme, Paris)

Click to enlarge
Bronze Tereg: wheel of life and endless knot

Click to enlarge


Bronze Tereg


 Rooks in form of Solomon's knots


Rooks in form of svastika (as a solar symbol, wood, beg. 20th c.)

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge
Tereg (Rook) pulled by a camel (wood, beg. of 20th c.)



 

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge
Rooks, wood, 1920

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge
 Rooks in shape of trees with large leafs, birds and men, wood, 1850


Portable yurts (wood and bronze)

 

The Xüü (Huu): equivalent to the Pawn.


(Musée de l'Homme, Paris)

Click to enlarge
single wrestlers

Click to enlarge
couple of wrestlers


Hares

Click to enlarge
Celestial Buddhistic peacocks

Click to enlarge
Couple of wrestlers 

Click to enlarge
Couple of wrestlers

Click to enlarge
Playing children with small animals

Click to enlarge
These horses are Xüü, not Mor'!

 

A set opposing Mongolian communists to Russian soviets (1936):

Click to enlarge


Wooden set opposing Mongolian communists (top) to Russian (bottom).


Two Nojons and two Bers (front and back views). One Nojon (left) is a soviet officier. The Bers are ferocious dogs.


Mor'



Soviet Russian cars (right) vs Mongolian cars with imprisoned bouddhist lamas! (1936)

 

Old wooden set made when Mongolia was controlled by the Mandchu Qing dynasty of China (circa 1790):


Click to enlargeClick to enlarge
Nojons with a Mandchu lord (top) vs two knights


Couples of wrestlers



Xüü as pairs of Knights

 

Wooden set with "drunk" Nojons (beg. 20th c.):

 

Set opposing the "bad", the Chinese, to the "good", the Mongolian
(wood, Inner Mongolia beg. of 20th c.):


The old Nojon (Chinese) and the young (Mongolian)


Temee and Mor'


Tereg


The Mongolian Xüü (Pawns) are celestial Buddhist Peacocks.


The Chinese Xüü (Pawns) are chickens. 


The Chinese Bers is a malign tiger, the Mongolian Bers is a sacred Buddhist lion.

click to enlarge
a

 

Other complete sets:


Soapstone (steatite) sets from Tuva


(Musée de l'Homme, Paris)


(Assia Popova)


Wooden set with musician Nojons, Mongolia, 1960


Wooden set (1850)

Click to enlarge
Wooden set (19th c.)


Wooden set from Mongolia, 1950


Here the Nojon bears a chessboard. The Tereg is a cart pulled by an elephant.


Wooden set with tents instead of camels for one side (top)

Click to enlarge
Wooden animal set

 
Metallic set opposing aggressive versus pacific (20th c.)


Metal set


Metal set 


Wooden set 


Metal sets with Garuda as Tereg-Rook (Thomas Thomsen)


 Ivory set

Click to enlarge
Mammoth ivory set


Hard stone set

Click to enlarge

References authored by Roldolfo Pozzi:

  • "I giochi di schacchi mongoli riflesso della cultura nomade delle steppe - The Mongolian chess sets reflecting the nomadic culture of the steppes", Chess Collectors International, 10th Biennal Convention, Philadelphia, USA, May 2002.
  • "The Mongolian and Tuvinian Chess sets and their symbolism", Chess Collectors International, 8th Convention, Vienna, Austria, May 1998.
  • "Les jeux d'échecs mongols", in Voyage en Mongolie, catalogue d'exposition présentée au Musée international du Carnaval et du Masque, 24 mai - 31 octobre 2003.
  • "Novita' nella ricerca sui giocchi di scacchi della Mongolia - Mongolian chess set: recent findings", bilingual (Italian-English), in The Chess Collector, Vol. XIII, N.1, Spring 2004.
  • "Gli scacchi mongoli", Soyombo, Autumn 2003, Milano.
  • "Gli scacchi della Mongolia", I quaderni del museo, Museo popoli e culture, 14/03/2009-14/06/2009, Milano

 

If there is any problem with the illustrations presented here, please do mail me.


The Bactrian camel with two humps

 13/03/2010